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John F. Kennedy:American University Commencement Addressdelivered10June1963AUTHENTICITY CERTIFIED:Textversion belowtranscribeddirectlyfromaudioPresident Anderson, members of the faculty, board of trustees, distinguished guests, my oldcolleague,Senator Bob Byrd, whohas earned his degree through many years of attendingnight law school, while I am earning mine in the next30 minutes, distinguished guests, ladiesand gentlemen:Itis with great pride that I participate in this ceremony of the AmericanUniversity, sponsoredby the Methodist Church, founded by Bishop John Fletcher Hurst, and first opened byPresidentWoodrow Wilsonin 1914. This is a young and growing university, but it has alyfulfilled Bishop Hursts enlightened hope for the study of history and public affairs in a citydevoted tothe making of history and tothe conduct of the publics business.By sponsoring this institution of higher learning for all who wishtolearn, whatever their coloror their creed,the Methodists of this area and the nation deserve the nations thanks, and Icommend all those who are today graduating. Professor WoodrowWilson once said thateverymansent out from a university should be a man of his nation as well as a man of his time,and I am confidentthatthe men and women who carry the honor of graduating from thisinstitution will continue to give from their lives, from their talents, a high measure of publicservice and public support.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page1AmericanRhetoric.com;There are fewearthly things more beautifulthan a university,; wrote John Masefield in histribute to English universities andhis words are equally true today. He did not refer totowers or to campuses. He admired the splendid beauty of a university, because it was, hesaid, ;a place where those who hate ignorance may strive toknow, where those who perceivetruth may strive tomake others see.;I have, therefore, chosen this time and place todiscuss a topic on which ignorance too oftenabounds and the truthtoo rarely perceived.And that is the most importanttopic on earth:peace. Whatkind of peace do I mean and whatkind of a peace do we seek? Not a PaxAmericana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Notthe peace of the grave orthe security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace,the kind of peace that makes lifeon earth worthliving, and the kind that enables men and nations to grow, and to hope, andbuild a better life for their childrennotmerely peace for Americans but peace for allmenand women, notmerely peace in our time but peace in alltime.I speak of peace because of the new face of war. Total war makes no sense in an age wheregreat powers canmaintainlarge and relatively invulnerable nuclear forces and refuse tosurrender without resort tothose forces. Itmakes no sense in an age where a single nuclearweapon contains almost ten times the explosive force delivered by allthe allied air forces inthe Second World War.Itmakes no sense in an age whenthe deadly poisons produced by a nuclear exchange wouldbe carried by wind and water and soil and seedto the far corners of the globe and togenerations yetunborn.Today the expenditure of billions of dollars every year on weapons acquired for the purpose ofmaking sure we never need them is essentialtothe keeping of peace.Butsurely theacquisition of such idle stockpiles whichcan only destroy and never create isnottheonly, much less the most efficient, means of assuring peace. I speak of peace, therefore, asthe necessary, rational end of rationalmen. I realize the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic asthe pursuit of war, and frequently the words of the pursuers fall on deaf ears. But we have nomore urgent task.Some say thatit is useless to speak of peace orworld law or world disarmament, and that itwill be useless until the leaders of the Soviet Union adopt a more enlightened attitude. I hopethey do. I believe we canhelp them doit. But Ialso believe that we must reexamine our ownattitudes, as individuals and as a Nation, for our attitude is as essential as theirs.And every graduate of this school, every thoughtfulcitizen who despairs of war and wishes tobring peace, should begin by looking inward, byexamining his own attitude towards thepossibilities of peace, towards the SovietUnion, towards the course of the cold war andtowards freedom and peace here athome.First examine our attitude towards peace itself. Too many of us think it is impossible.Toomany think itis unreal. Butthatis a dangerous, defeatistbelief. Itleads tothe conclusion thatwar is inevitable, that mankind is doomed,that we are gripped by forces we cannotcontrol.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page2AmericanRhetoric.comWe need not accept that view. Our problems are manmade. therefore,they can be solved byman. And mancan be as big as he wants. No problem of humandestiny is beyond humanbeings. Mans reason and spirithave oftensolved the seemingly unsolvable, and we believethey can doit again. I am notreferring tothe absolute,infinite concept of universal peace andgood will of which some fantasies and fanatics dream.I donot deny the value of hopes anddreams but we merely invite discouragement and incredulity by making that our only andimmediate goal.Letus focus instead on a more practical, more attainable peace, based not on a suddenrevolution in human nature but on a gradual evolution in humaninstitutions ona series ofconcrete actions and effective agreements which are in the interest of all concerned. There isno single, simple key to this peace. no grand or magic formula to be adopted by one or twopowers. Genuine peace must be the product ofmany nations, the sum of many acts. It mustbe dynamic, notstatic, changing to meet the challenge of eachnewgeneration. For peace is aprocess away of solving problems.With such a peace,there will still be quarrels and conflicting interests, as there are withinfamilies and nations. World peace, like community peace, does not require that eachmanlovehis neighbor, it requires only thatthey live together in mutualtolerance, submitting theirdisputes to a just and peaceful settlement. And history teaches us that enmities betweennations, as betweenindividuals, donotlast forever. However fixed our likes and dislikes mayseem, the tide of time and events will often bring surprising changes in the relations betweennations and neighbors. So let us persevere. Peace need not be impracticable, and war neednot be inevitable. By defining our goal more clearly, by making it seem more manageable andless remote, we canhelp all people to see it, todraw hope from it, and to move irresistiblytowards it.And second, let us reexamine our attitude towards the Soviet Union. Itis discouraging to thinkthattheir leaders may actually believe what their propagandists write.Itis discouraging to a recent, authoritative Soviet text on military strategy and find, on page after page,wholly baseless and incredible claims, such as the allegationthat American imperialist circlesare preparing to unleash differenttypes of war, thatthere is a very real threat of a preventivewar being unleashed by American imperialists againstthe SovietUnion, and thatthe politicalaims andI e ;of the Americanimperialists are to enslave economically and politicallythe European and other capitalist countries and to achieve world domination by means ofaggressive war.;Truly, as it was writtenlong ago: ;The wicked flee whennoman pursueth.;Yetitis sad to these Soviet statements, torealize the extent of the gulf betweenus. Butit is also a warning, a warning tothe American people notto fall into the same trap as theSoviets, not tosee only a distorted and desperate view of the other side, notto see conflict asinevitable, accommodation as impossible, and communication as nothing more than anexchange of threats.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page3AmericanRhetoric.comNo government or socialsystem is soevilthat its people must be considered as lacking invirtue. As Americans, we find communism profoundly repugnant as a negation of personalfreedom and dignity. But we canstillhailthe Russian people for their many achievements inscience and space, in economic and industrial growth, in culture, in acts of courage.Among the many traits the peoples of our two countries have in common, none is strongerthan our mutual abhorrence of war. Almostunique among the major world powers, we havenever been at war with each other. And nonationin the history of battle ever suffered morethanthe SovietUnion in the SecondWorld War.Atleast20 millionlost their lives. Countlessmillions of homes and families were burned or sacked.A third of the nations territory,including two thirds of its industrial base, was turned into a wasteland aloss equivalenttothe destruction of this country east of Chicago.Today, should total war ever break out again nomatter how ourtwo countries will be theprimary target. Itis an ironic but accurate fact that the two strongest powers are the two inthe most danger of devastation. All we have built, all we have worked for, would be destroyedin the first24 hours. And evenin the cold war,which brings burdens and dangers toso manycountries, including this Nations closest allies, our two countries bear the heaviest burdens.For we are both devoting massive sums of money to weapons that could be better devoted tocombat ignorance, poverty, and disease.We are both caughtup in a vicious and dangerouscycle, with suspicion on one side breeding suspicion on the other, and new weapons begettingcounterweapons.In short, both the ed States and its allies, and the SovietUnion and itsallies, have a mutually deep interest in a just and genuine peace and in halting the arms race.Agreements tothis end are in the interests of the Soviet Union as well as ours. And eventhemosthostile nations can be relied uponto accept and keep those treaty obligations, and onlythose treaty obligations, which are in their own interest.So letus not be blind to our differences, butletus also direct attentionto our commoninterests and the means by which those differences can be resolved. And if we cannot endnow our differences, atleast we can help makethe world safe for diversity. For in the finalanalysis, our most basic commonlink is that weallinhabit this small planet. We all breathethe same air. We all cherish our childrens futures. And we are all mortal.Third,let us reexamine our attitude towards the cold war, remembering were not engaged ina debate, seeking to pile up debating points. We are nothere distributing blame or pointingthe finger of judgment. We must deal with theworld as itis, and not as itmighthave beenhadthe history of the last18 years been different. We must, therefore, persevere in thesearch for peace in the hope that constructive changes withinthe Communist bloc might bringwithin reach solutions which nowseem beyond us. We must conduct our affairs in such a waythatit becomes in the Communists interest to agree on a genuine peace. And above all, whiledefending our own vitalinterests, nuclear powers must avert those confrontations which bringan adversary to a choice of either a humiliating retreat or a nuclear war. To adopt thatkind ofcourse in the nuclear age would be evidence only of the bankruptcy of our policy orof acollective deathwishfor the world.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page4AmericanRhetoric.comTo secure these ends,Americas weapons are nonprovocative, carefully controlled, designedto deter, and capable of selective use. Our military forces are committed to peace anddisciplined in selfrestraint.Our diplomats are instructed to avoid unnecessary irritants andpurely rhetorical hostility. For we can seek a relaxation of tensions without relaxing our guard.And,for our part, we do not need touse threats to prove we are resolute. We donotneed tojam foreign broadcasts out of fear our faith willbe eroded. We are unwilling toimpose oursystem on any unwilling people, but we are willing and able to engage in peacefulcompetitionwith any people on earth.Meanwhile, we seek tostrengthen the ed Nations, to help solve its financial problems, tomake it a more effective instrument for peace,to develop it into a genuine world securitysystem asystem capable of resolving disputes onthe basis of law, of insuring the securityof the large and the small, and of creating conditions under which arms canfinally beabolished.At the same time we seek tokeep peace inside the nonCommunistworld, wheremany nations, all of them our friends, are divided over issues which weakenWesternunity,whichinvite Communistintervention, or whichthreaten toerupt into war. Our efforts in WestNew Guinea,in the Congo, inthe Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent, have beenpersistent and patient despite criticism from both sides. We have alsotried to set anexamplefor others, by seeking to adjust small but significant differences with our own closestneighbors in Mexico and Canada.Speaking of other nations, I wishto make one point clear.We are bound tomany nations byalliances. Those alliances exist because our concern and theirs substantially overlap. Ourcommitmentto defendWesternEurope and West Berlin, for example,stands undiminishedbecause of the identity of our vital interests. The ed States will make no deal withtheSovietUnion at the expense of other nations and other peoples, not merely because they areour partners, but also because their interests and ours converge.Our interests converge,however, not only in defending the frontiers of freedom, but in pursuing the paths of peace.Itis our hope, and the purpose of allied policy, to convince the SovietUnion that she,too,should let eachnation choose its ownfuture, solong as that choice does notinterfere with thechoices of others. The Communist drive toimpose their political and economic system onothers is the primary cause of world tensiontoday. For there can be no doubtthatif allnations could refrain from interfering in the selfdeterminationof others, the peace would bemuchmore assured.This will require a new effort to achieve world law, a new contextfor world discussions. It willrequire increased understanding betweenthe Soviets and ourselves. And increasedunderstanding will require increased contact and communication.One step in this directionis the proposed arrangementfor a direct line between Moscow andWashington, to avoid on each side the dangerous delays, misunderstandings, and misingsof others actions whichmight occur at a time of crisis.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page5AmericanRhetoric.comWe have also beentalking in Geneva about our firststepmeasures of arm[s] controlsdesigned tolimitthe intensity of the arms race and reduce the risk of accidental war. Ourprimary long range interest in Geneva,however, is general and complete disarmament,designed totake place by stages, permitting parallel politicaldevelopments to build the newinstitutions of peace which would take the placeof arms. The pursuit of disarmament hasbeen aneffort of this Government since the 1920s. Ithas beenurgently sought by the pastthree administrations. And however dim the prospects are today, we intend to continue thisefforttocontinue it in order that all countries, including our own, can better grasp what theproblems and possibilities of disarmament are.The only major area of these negotiations where the end is in sight, yet where a fresh start isbadly needed, is in a treaty to outlaw nuclear tests. The conclusion of such a treaty, sonearand yetso far, would check the spiraling arms race in one of its most dangerous areas. Itwould place the nuclear powers in a positiontodealmore effectively with one of the greatesthazards which manfaces in1963, the further sp of nuclear arms. It would increase oursecurity. it would decrease the prospects of war. Surely this goal is sufficiently importanttorequire our steady pursuit, yielding neither to the temptationto give up the whole effortnorthe temptationto give up our insistence on vital and responsible safeguards.Im taking this opportunity, therefore, to announce twoimportant decisions in this regard.First, Chairman Khrushchev, Prime Minister Macmillan, and I have agreed that highleveldiscussions will shortly begin in Moscowlooking towards early agreement on a comprehensivetest bantreaty. Our hope must be tempered Ourhopes must be tempered with the cautionof history. but with our hopes gothe hopes of all mankind. Second,tomake clear our goodfaith and solemn convictions on this matter, Inow declare thatthe ed States does notpropose toconduct nuclear tests in the atmosphere solong as other states donot do so. Wewillnot Wewillnot be the firstto resume. Such a declaration is no substitute for a formalbinding treaty, but Ihope it will help us achieve one. Nor would such a treaty be a substitutefor disarmament, but I hope it willhelp us achieve it.Finally, my fellow Americans, let us examine our attitude towards peace and freedom here athome. The quality and spirit of our ownsocietymust justify and support our efforts abroad.We must show it in the dedication of our ownlives asmany of you who are graduatingtoday willhave an opportunity to do, by serving without pay in the Peace Corps abroad or inthe proposed National Service Corps here athome. But wherever we are, we must all, in ourdaily lives, live up to the ageoldfaiththat peace and freedom walk together. Intoo many ofour cities today, the peace is not secure because freedom is incomplete. Itis the responsibilityof the executive branch at alllevels of governmentlocal,State, and National toprovideand protectthat freedom for all of our citizens by allmeans within our authority. Itis theresponsibility of the legislative branch at alllevels, wherever the authority is notnowadequate, tomake it adequate.And it is the responsibility of all citizens in all sections of thiscountry torespect the rights of others and respectthe law of the land.Transcription byMichaelE. Eidenmuller. Propertyof AmericanRhetoric.com. . Copyright 2006. All rights reserved.Page6AmericanRhetoric.comAll this Allthis is notunrelated to world peace. ;When a mans way[s] please the Lord,; theScriptures tellus, ;he maketh even his enemies to be at peace withhim.;And is not peace, inthe last analysis, basically a matter of human rights: the rightto live out our lives withoutfearof devastation. the rightto breathe air as nature provided it. the right of future generations toa healthy existence?While we proceed tosafeguard our nationalinterests, letus also safeguard humaninterests.And the elimination of war and arms is clearly in the interest of both. Notreaty, howevermuchit may be tothe advantage of all, however tightly it may be worded, can provideabsolute security againstthe risks of deceptionand evasion. Butitcan, if it is sufficientlyeffective inits enforcement, and itis sufficiently in the interests of its signers, offer far moresecurity and far fewer risks than an unabated,uncontrolled,unpredictable arms race.The ed States, as the world knows, willnever start a war. We do not want a war. We donotnow expect a war. This generation of Americans has aly had enoughmorethanenough ofwar and hate and oppression.We shall be prepared if others wish it. We shallbe alerttotry tostop it. But we shall also doour partto build a world of peace where the weak are safe and the strong are just. We are nothelpless before thattask or hopeless of its success. Confident and unafraid, we mustlabor onnottowards a strategy of annihilation but towards a strategy of peace. /201205/182138This week, I traveled to Afghanistan--to thank our troops serving far from home, and to sign an historic agreement that will help us complete our mission and end the war.As Commander-in-Chief, nothing is more humbling or inspiring than the chance to spend some time with our troops. At Bagram Air Base, I visited with some of our outstanding men and women in uniform. I thanked them for their extraordinary service. And I let them know that America honors their sacrifice.Because of their bravery and dedication, the tide of war has turned in Afghanistan. We have broken the Taliban’s momentum. We’ve built strong Afghan Security Forces. We have devastated al Qaeda’s leadership. And one year ago, our troops launched the operation that killed Osama bin Laden. The goal that I set – to defeat al Qaeda, and deny it a chance to rebuild – is within reach.Because of the progress we have made, I was able to sign an historic agreement between the ed States and Afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries – a future in which Afghans are responsible for the security of their nation, and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states; a future in which the war ends, and a new chapter begins.The enormous sacrifices of our men and women in uniform are not over. But many of our troops are aly coming home. Last year, we removed 10,000 U.S. troops from Afghanistan. Another 23,000 will leave by the end of the summer. As our coalition agreed, by the end of 2014, the Afghans will be fully responsible for the security of their countryAnd this is as it should be. Because after more than a decade of war, it is time to focus on nation building here at home.As a new greatest generation returns from overseas, we must ask ourselves, what kind of country will they come back to? Will it be a country where a shrinking number of Americans do really well while a growing number barely get by? Or will it be a country where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same set of rules – a country with opportunity worthy of the troops who protect us?America has answered this question before. My grandfather, a veteran of Patton’s Army, got the chance to go to college on the GI Bill. My grandmother, who worked on a bomber assembly line, was part of a workforce that turned out the best products on Earth. They contributed to a story of success that every American had the chance to share in, the basic American promise that if you work hard, you could do well enough to raise a family, own a home, send your kids to college, and put a little away for retirement.Keeping that promise alive is the defining issue of our time. But it means making responsible choices.I don’t think we should prioritize things like more tax cuts for millionaires while cutting the kinds of investments that built a strong middle class.That’s why I’ve called on Congress to take the money we’re no longer spending at war, use half of it to pay down our debt, and use the other half to rebuild America.Because we’ve got more jobs to create. More students to educate. More clean energy to generate. More entrepreneurs with the next great idea, just looking for their shot at success. We’ve got to invest in things like education and medical research. We’ve got to build newer, faster transportation and communication networks. And we’ve got to secure the care and benefits our veterans have earned, so that we serve them as well as they have served us.Every time I have the privilege of meeting with our troops, I’m struck by their courage, their commitment, their selflessness, and their teamwork. They have something to teach us. Recovering from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression is a work in progress--but if we follow their example, then I have no doubt we will preserve the promise of this country, protect the freedoms we cherish, and leave for our children an America that’s built to last.God bless you, and have a great weekend.201205/181180

本演讲暂无音频President Bush Discusses Volunteerism THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, all. Please be seated. Welcome to the South Ground of the White House. It is a joy to be here with members of the armies of compassion. I'm really glad you're here and I appreciate your inspiration to our fellow citizens. I believe you are a constant reminder of the true source of our nation's strength, which is the good hearts and souls of the American people.We have seen the good hearts of our people over the last week as caring volunteers have helped their fellow citizens through Hurricane Gustav and Tropical Storm Hanna. The Red Cross, which provides a vital role in helping the relief efforts and recovery efforts, has been spending millions of dollars to provide shelter and food for evacuees and to help with the clean-up efforts. Yet charitable contributions have not kept pace with their expenses, and I hope our fellow citizens will support the Red Cross, particularly as Hurricane Ike and other storms develop over the Gulf Coast. You can help by going to the Red Cross's website -- redcross.org -- and make a vital contribution to help our fellow citizens.I appreciate the fact that those here represent the hundreds of thousands of our citizens who answered the call to love a neighbor like we'd like to be loved ourselves. I appreciate the fact that you and others lift up souls, one person at a time. You strengthen the foundation of our democracy, which is the engagement of our people. I want to thank you for what you do. God bless you and welcome. (Applause.)I thank Secretary Dirk Kempthorne, Department of the Interior, and Patricia, who have joined us; Secretary of Commerce, Carlos Gutierrez; Secretary of Transportation, Mary Peters; Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy, welcome Madame Congresswoman, thanks for coming. I appreciate Stephen Goldsmith, the Chairman of the Corporation for National and Community Service; Jack Hawkins, Director of Volunteers for Prosperity; Ron Tschetter, who is the Director of the Peace Corps -- (applause) -- I knew that was coming. (Laughter.) Jean Case, the Chairman of the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation and members of that council.I appreciate my buddy, Michael W. Smith, who is going to play a couple of songs for us here. (Applause.) And his wife, Debbie. I want to thank student and school administrators and board members from the LEUE that are here today. These are students from schools all across the country. (Applause.) We are glad you are here.With us is the 2007 Spirit of Hope Award Recipient. This is the military's way of honoring people who have given back to their communities. Giovanni Balingit -- Giovanni, welcome; thank you, sir; congratulations to you. (Applause.) I want to thank all those who are here in the ed States military. Thank you for wearing the uniform of the ed States. (Applause.)But most of all, thanks for coming. I really appreciate you taking time out to come by and let me say hello to you.In my first inaugural address, I challenged all Americans to be "citizens, not spectators ... responsible citizens, building communities of service and a nation of character."Eight months later Americans were tested by the worst attack on our nation. In the midst of chaos and sorrow, Americans responded with the -- with characteristic courage and grace. It was a remarkable moment in our country. It really was, when you think about it. Rescue workers wrote their Social Security numbers on their arms and then rushed into buildings. Citizens became members of ambulance teams. And people from all across the country poured into New York City to help.The terrorists who attacked our country on September the 11th didn't understand our country at all. Evil may crush concrete and twist steel, but it can never break the spirit of the American people. (Applause.)In the weeks and months after the attacks, inspiring acts continued to unfold all across the country. I'm sure you heard the stories, just like I did. Men and women of our armed forces accepted dangerous new duties, and a lot of folks stepped forward to volunteer to protect our fellow citizens. But the desire to serve reached far beyond the military. Millions of Americans were -- really wanted to help our country recover.And so to tap into that spirit, I called on every American to spend at least 4,000 hours -- or two years in the course of a lifetime -- to serve our nation through acts of compassion. Some said that's acting -- asking a lot for the country, and they were right -- and they were right. Two years during a lifetime is a lot to give. But the truth of the matter is, citizens who do give realize that they become enriched just like those folks that they're helping.To empower Americans looking to help, we launched what's called the USA Freedom Corps. The goal of the USA Freedom Corps was to connect Americans with opportunities to serve our country, to foster a culture of citizenship and responsibility and service. Over the last six years, USA Freedom Corps has met these goals.One way we helped was to launch a web site called volunteer.gov, which is the largest clearinghouse of volunteer opportunities in America. In other words, we used high-tech innovations to be able to channel people's desire to serve in a constructive way.And so this government website directs people to private charities, or local churches, or Habitat for Humanity drives, or Meals on Wheels -- just opportunities to serve their neighbor. We can't put love in somebody's heart, but we certainly can help somebody channel their love. And that was the purpose of the website.And you can search my hometown. They tell me that if you get on Crawford, Texas, you'll find that the local Humane Society seeks volunteer pet groomers -- which makes Barney really nervous. (Laughter.)This is just one of 4 million volunteer opportunities on the USA Freedom Corps web site. Isn't that interesting? There are 4 million opportunities for somebody who wants to serve to say, here's how I can help. And so I urge our fellow citizens to go to the website and find out if there's not something that'll interest you, something that'll give you a chance to serve something greater than yourself.USA Freedom Corps fosters a culture of service by encouraging the private sector to step forward. We got what we call the pro bono challenge, which encourages corporate professionals to donate their services to charities and nonprofits. That makes a lot of sense, doesn't it, to encourage corporate America to not only serve their shareholders, but serve the communities in which they exist.One really interesting, innovative idea came out of IBM this year. IBM employees will donate millions of dollars of service to charities in the U.S., as well as technology projects in developing nations. They tell me that this work would cost 0 million if IBM's devoted employees were charging, and not providing for free. I want to thank the CEO of IBM, Sam Palmisano, who is with us today. Sam, thank you very much for coming. (Applause.) And I encourage corporate America to figure out ways that they can serve to make America a better place.Another key component of USA Freedom Corps is our effort to keep track of Americans' service to others. I mean, it's one thing to talk about it, it's another thing to measure, to kind of see how we're doing. In 2002, this administration became the first to conduct a regular survey of volunteerism through the U.S. Census Bureau. Because we've begun to measure, we know that nearly 61 million Americans now give their time to help their neighbors. Isn't that interesting? Sixty-one million of our fellow citizens volunteer. (Applause.)200809/47880

Remarks by President Obama and Commerce Secretary Nominee Gary LockeTHE WHITE HOUSEOffice of the Press Secretary___________________________For Immediate Release February 25, 11:08 A.M. ESTTHE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. Last night, I outlined my vision for our common future -- one in which we accept the responsibility to act boldly and wisely to confront the extraordinary challenges of our times, put people back to work doing the work America needs done, and lay a new foundation for America's growth and prosperity.Today, I'm pleased to announce that I'm filling out my economic team with a man who shares that vision, and who will play a key role in carrying it out as my Secretary of Commerce: Governor Gary Locke.Now, I'm sure it's not lost on anyone that we've tried this a couple of times, but I'm a big believer in keeping at something until you get it right. And Gary is the right man for this job.Sometimes the American story can be told in the span of a single mile. More than 100 years ago, Gary's grandfather left China on a steamship bound for America. He had no family here. He spoke no English. He found work as a servant, and purpose in a dream. He raised a son -- Gary's father -- who would go on to fight in World War II, return home and open a grocery store, and later raise a family of his own.Gary didn't learn English until he was five, but he earned the rank of Eagle Scout, worked his way through Yale University with the help of scholarships and student loans, and got a law degree. He returned to Washington state and served as a prosecutor, a state representative, chief executive of one of the most populous counties in the ed States, and finally as governor -- in the State Capitol building not one mile from the home where his grandfather worked as a servant all those years ago.So Gary knows the American Dream. He's lived it. And that's why he shares my commitment to do whatever it takes to keep it alive in our time.Because somewhere in America, another small business owner is hard at work on the next big idea and dreaming big dreams for his grandchild. A scientist is on the cusp of the next breakthrough discovery. An entrepreneur is sketching designs for the startup that will revolutionize an industry. Our economic crisis has put these plans at risk, but it has not dimmed the dreams that inspired them.That's why we've put a recovery plan into action that will save or create 3.5 million jobs over the next two years. That's why the vast majority of these jobs -- 90 percent -- will be created in the private sector, because we know that business, not government, is the engine of growth in this country.It is entrepreneurship and industry that are the wellsprings of an economy that has been the greatest force of progress and prosperity in human history. It is America's workers and businesses that employ them that will determine our economic destiny. It is the task of the Department of Commerce to help create conditions in which our workers can prosper, our businesses can thrive, and our economy can grow.That's what Gary did in Washington state, convincing businesses to set up shop and create the jobs of the 21st century -- jobs in science and technology; agriculture and energy -- jobs that pay well and can't be shipped overseas. That's what he did by establishing favorable markets abroad where Washington state's businesses could sell their products. That's what he did by unleashing powerful partnerships between state and local governments, between labor and business -- all with an eye toward prosperity and progress for all those in his state who had dreams of their own.So Gary will be a trusted voice in my Cabinet, a tireless advocate for our economic competitiveness, and an influential ambassador for American industry who will help us do everything we can -- especially now -- to promote our industry around the world. I'm grateful he's agreed to leave one Washington for another. I'm looking forward to having him on my team as we continue the work of turning our economy around and bringing about a stronger, more prosperous future for all Americans.Ladies and gentlemen, I want to introduce to you an outstanding public servant, somebody I'm certain will be a great Secretary of Commerce, Gary Locke. (Applause.)03/63857亲,你们想拥有一口流利的英语口语吗?你们想像世界名人一样拥有敏锐的智慧、滔滔不绝的口才吗?在这里,大家不但可以聆听抑扬顿挫的英文,而且还可以学习到名人的过人之处,相信会受益匪浅的!听,他们来了......201202/170845

Over the weekend, President Obama continued to urge both parties to come together around a balanced package to deficit reduction. Today, the President provided an update on the efforts to lift the debt ceiling and also tackle the underlying challenges we face with our national debt and deficits.Download Video: mp4 (69MB) | mp3 (7MB) 201107/145178mp4视频下载 REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENTON REDUCING SPENDING IN THE BUDGET Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office BuildingRoom 35010:42 A.M. EDTTHE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. All across this country, Americans are responding to difficult economic times by tightening their belts and making tough decisions about where they need to spend and where they need to save. The question the American people are asking is whether Washington is prepared to act with the same sense of responsibility.I believe we can and must do exactly that. Over the course of our first hundred days in office, my administration has taken aggressive action to confront a historic economic crisis. We're doing everything that we can to create jobs and to get our economy moving while building a new foundation for lasting prosperity -- a foundation that invests in quality education, lowers health care costs, and develops new sources of energy powered by new jobs and industries.But one of the pillars of this foundation is fiscal responsibility. We can no longer afford to spend as if deficits don't matter and waste is not our problem. We can no longer afford to leave the hard choices for the next budget, the next administration -- or the next generation.That's why I've charged the Office of Management and Budget, led by Peter Orszag and Rob Nabors who are standing behind me today, with going through the budget -- program by program, item by item, line by line -- looking for areas where we can save taxpayer dollars.Today, the budget office is releasing the first report in this process: a list of more than 100 programs slated to be reduced or eliminated altogether. And the process is ongoing.I want to be clear: There are many, many people doing valuable work for our government across the country and around the world. And it's important that we support these folks -- people who don't draw a big paycheck or earn a lot of praise but who do tough, thankless jobs on our behalf in our government. So this is not a criticism of them.At the same time, we have to admit that there is a lot of money that's being spent inefficiently, ineffectively, and, in some cases, in ways that are actually pretty stunning.Some programs may have made sense in the past -- but are no longer needed in the present. Other programs never made any sense; the end result of a special interest's successful lobbying campaign. Still other programs perform functions that can be conducted more efficiently, or are aly carried out more effectively elsewhere in the government.One example of a program we will cut is a long-range radio navigation system which costs taxpayers million a year. This system once made a lot of sense, before there were satellites to help us navigate. Now there's GPS. And yet, year after year, this obsolete technology has continued to be funded even though it serves no government function and very few people are left who still actually use it.Another example is the National Institute for Literacy. Now, I strongly support initiatives that promote literacy -- it's critical -- but I oppose programs that do it badly. Last year, nearly half of the funding in this program was spent on overhead. So we've proposed cutting the million for this program in favor of supporting literacy efforts within the Department of Education which use tax dollars more effectively and wisely.We're also closing an office maintained by the Department of Education in Paris. This is an office that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to employ one person as a representative to ed Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO. Now, participation in UNESCO is very important, but we can save this money and still participate using e-mail and teleconferencing and a small travel budget.In addition, we're going to save money by eliminating unnecessary defense programs that do nothing to keep us safe, but rather prevent us from spending money on what does keep us safe. One example is a 5 million program to build an alternate engine for the Joint Strike Fighter. The Defense Department is aly pleased with the engine it has. The engine it has works. The Pentagon does not want and does not plan to use the alternative version. That's why the Pentagon stopped requesting this funding two years ago. Yet it's still being funded.05/69100第七届全国英语演讲比赛 白羽翰 美国经典英文演讲100篇总统演讲布莱尔首相演讲美国总统布什演讲快报 200809/50902

President Bush Presents Medal of Honor to Private First Class Ross Andrew McGinnis THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. Welcome to the White House.A week ago on Memorial Day, the flag of the ed States flew in half-staff in tribute to those who fell in service to our country. Today we pay special homage to one of those heroes: Private First Class Ross Andrew McGinnis of the U.S. Army. Private McGinnis died in a combat zone in Iraq on December the 4th, 2006 -- and for his heroism that day, he now receives the Medal of Honor. In a few moments, the military aide will the citation, and the Medal will be accepted by Rosss mom and dad, Romayne and Tom. Its a privilege to have with us as well Becky and Katie, Rosss sisters.I also want to thank the other distinguished guests who have joined us: Mr. Vice President; Secretary Jim Peake of Veterans Affairs; Secretary Pete Geren of the Army; Secretary Michael Wynne of the Air Force; General Jim "Hoss" Cartwright, the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs. I appreciate other members of the administration for joining us.I want to thank members of the ed States Congress who have joined us today: Steve Buyer, John Peterson, Louie Gohmert. Thank you all for coming. I appreciate the Chaplain for the prayer. We welcome friends and family members of Ross, as well as members of the 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, including Charlie Company, thats with us today.Were also joined by Private McGinniss vehicle crew -- the very men who witnessed his incredible bravery. We welcome Sergeant First Class Cedric Thomas, Staff Sergeant Ian Newland, Sergeant Lyle Buehler, and Specialist Sean Lawson.A special welcome to the prior recipients of the Medal of Honor, whose presence here is -- means a lot to the McGinnis family. Thank you for coming.The Medal of Honor is the nations highest military distinction. Its given for valor beyond anything that duty could require, or a superior could command. By long tradition, its presented by the President. For any President, doing so is a high privilege.Before he entered our countrys history, Ross McGinnis came of age in the town of Knox, Pennsylvania. Back home they remember a slender boy with a big heart and a carefree spirit. He was a regular guy. He loved playing basketball. He loved working on cars. He wasnt too wild about schoolwork. (Laughter.) He had a lot of friends and a great sense of humor. In high school and in the Army, Ross became known for his ability to do impersonations. A buddy from boot camp said that Ross was the only man there who could make the drill sergeant laugh. (Laughter.)Most of all, those who knew Ross McGinnis recall him as a dependable friend and a really good guy. If Ross was your buddy and you needed help or you got in trouble, hed stick with you and be the one you could count on. One of his friends told a reporter that Ross was the type "who would do anything for anybody." That element of his character was to make all the difference when Ross McGinnis became a soldier in the Army. One afternoon 18 months ago, Private McGinnis was part of a humvee patrol in a neighborhood of Baghdad. From his position in the gun turret, he noticed a grenade thrown directly at the vehicle. In an instant, the grenade dropped through the gunners hatch. He shouted a warning to the four men inside. Confined in that tiny space, the soldiers had no chance of escaping the explosion. Private McGinnis could have easily jumped from the humvee and saved himself. Instead he dropped inside, put himself against the grenade, and absorbed the blast with his own body.By that split-second decision, Private McGinnis lost his own life, and he saved his comrades. One of them was Platoon Sergeant Cedric Thomas, who said this: "He had time to jump out of the truck. He chose not to. Hes a hero. He was just an awesome guy." For his actions, Private McGinnis received the Silver Star, a posthumous promotion in rank, and a swift nomination for the Medal of Honor. But it wasnt acclaim or credit that motivated him. Rosss dad has said, "I know medals never crossed his mind. He was always about friendships and relationships. He just took that to the ultimate this time."When Ross McGinnis was in kindergarten, the teacher asked him to draw a picture of what he wanted to be when he grew up. He drew a soldier. Today our nation recognizing -- recognizes him as a soldier, and more than that -- because he did far more than his duty. In the words of one of our commanding generals, "Four men are alive because this soldier embodied our Army values and gave his life."The day will come when the mission he served has been completed and the fighting is over, and freedom and security have prevailed. America will never forget those who came forward to bear the battle. America will always honor the name of this brave soldier who gave all for his country, and was taken to rest at age 19.No one outside this mans family can know the true weight of their loss. But in words spoken long ago, we are told how to measure the kind of devotion that Ross McGinnis showed on his last day: "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." Gospel also gives this assurance: "Blessed are they that mourn, for they shall be comforted." May the deep respect of our whole nation be a comfort to the family of this fallen soldier. May God always watch over the country he served, and keep us ever grateful for the life of Ross Andrew McGinnis.And now Id like to invite Mr. and Mrs. McGinnis to please come forward for the presentation, and the military aide will the citation for the Medal of Honor.The citation is : The President of the ed States of America, authorized by act of Congress, March 3rd, 1863, has awarded in the name of Congress the Medal of Honor to Private First Class Ross A. McGinnis, ed States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Private First Class Ross A. McGinnis distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an M2 .50-caliber Machine Gunner, 1st Platoon, C Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, in connection with combat operations against an armed enemy in Adhamiyah, Northeast Baghdad, Iraq, on 4 December 2006.That afternoon his platoon was conducting combat control operations in an effort to reduce and control sectarian violence in the area. While Private McGinnis was manning the M2 .50-caliber Machine Gun, a fragmentation grenade thrown by an insurgent fell through the gunners hatch into the vehicle. Reacting quickly, he yelled "grenade," allowing all four members of his crew to prepare for the grenades blast. Then, rather than leaping from the gunners hatch to safety, Private McGinnis made the courageous decision to protect his crew. In a selfless act of bravery, in which he was mortally wounded, Private McGinnis covered the live grenade, pinning it between his body and the vehicle and absorbing most of the explosion.Private McGinnis gallant action directly saved four men from certain serious injury or death. Private First Class McGinnis extraordinary heroism and selflessness at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the ed States Army.(The Medal of Honor is presented.) (Applause.)200806/41925[AUTHENTICITY CERTIFIED: Text version below transcribed directly from audio.]Moderator: Ladies and Gentlemen: The President of the ed States, Ronald Reagan.President Reagan: Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you very much.And, Reverend Clergy all, Senator Hawkins, distinguished members of the Florida congressional delegation, and all of you: I can't tell you how you have warmed my heart with your welcome. I'm delighted to be here today.Those of you in the National Association of Evangelicals are known for your spiritual and humanitarian work. And I would be especially remiss if I didn't discharge right now one personal debt of gratitude. Thank you for your prayers. Nancy and I have felt their presence many times in many ways. And believe me, for us they've made all the difference.The other day in the East Room of the White House at a meeting there, someone asked me whether I was aware of all the people out there who were praying for the President. And I had to say, "Yes, I am. I've felt it. I believe in intercessionary prayer." But I couldn't help but say to that questioner after he'd asked the question that -- or at least say to them that if sometimes when he was praying he got a busy signal, it was just me in there ahead of him. I think I understand how Abraham Lincoln felt when he said, "I have been driven many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go." From the joy and the good feeling of this conference, I go to a political reception. Now, I don't know why, but that bit of scheduling reminds me of a story which I'll share with you.An evangelical minister and a politician arrived at Heaven's gate one day together. And St. Peter, after doing all the necessary formalities, took them in hand to show them where their quarters would be. And he took them to a small, single room with a bed, a chair, and a table and said this was for the clergyman. And the politician was a little worried about what might be in store for him. And he couldn't believe it then when St. Peter stopped in front of a beautiful mansion with lovely grounds, many servants, and told him that these would be his quarters.And he couldn't help but ask, he said, "But wait, how -- there's something wrong -- how do I get this mansion while that good and holy man only gets a single room?" And St. Peter said, "You have to understand how things are up here. We've got thousands and thousands of clergy. You're the first politician who ever made it."But I don't want to contribute to a stereotype. So I tell you there are a great many God-fearing, dedicated, noble men and women in public life, present company included. And yes, we need your help to keep us ever-mindful of the ideas and the principles that brought us into the public arena in the first place. The basis of those ideals and principles is a commitment to freedom and personal liberty that, itself is grounded in the much deeper realization that freedom prospers only where the blessings of God are avidly sought and humbly accepted.The American experiment in democracy rests on this insight. Its discovery was the great triumph of our Founding Fathers, voiced by William Penn when he said: "If we will not be governed by God, we must be governed by tyrants." Explaining the inalienable rights of men, Jefferson said, "The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time." And it was George Washington who said that "of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports."And finally, that shrewdest of all observers of American democracy, Alexis de Tocqueville, put it eloquently after he had gone on a search for the secret of America's greatness and genius -- and he said: "Not until I went into the churches of America and heard her pulpits aflame with righteousness did I understand the greatness and the genius of America. America is good. And if America ever ceases to be good, America will cease to be great."Well, I'm pleased to be here today with you who are keeping America great by keeping her good. Only through your work and prayers and those of millions of others can we hope to survive this perilous century and keep alive this experiment in liberty, this last, best hope of man.I want you to know that this administration is motivated by a political philosophy that sees the greatness of America in you, her people, and in your families, churches, neighborhoods, communities: the institutions that foster and nourish values like concern for others and respect for the rule of law under God.Now, I don't have to tell you that this puts us in opposition to, or at least out of step with, a -- a prevailing attitude of many who have turned to a modern-day secularism, discarding the tried and time-tested values upon which our very civilization is based. No matter how well intentioned, their value system is radically different from that of most Americans. And while they proclaim that they're freeing us from superstitions of the past, they've taken upon themselves the job of superintending us by government rule and regulation. Sometimes their voices are louder than ours, but they are not yet a majority.An example of that vocal superiority is evident in a controversy now going on in Washington. And since I'm involved I've been waiting to hear from the parents of young America. How far are they willing to go in giving to government their prerogatives as parents?Let me state the case as briefly and simply as I can. An organization of citizens, sincerely motivated, deeply concerned about the increase in illegitimate births and abortions involving girls well below the age of consent, some time ago established a nationwide network of clinics to offer help to these girls and, hopefully, alleviate this situation. Now, again, let me say, I do not fault their intent. However, in their well-intentioned effort, these clinics decided to provide advice and birth control drugs and devices to underage girls without the knowledge of their parents.For some years now, the federal government has helped with funds to subsidize these clinics. In providing for this, the Congress decreed that every effort would be made to maximize parental participation. Nevertheless, the drugs and devices are prescribed without getting parental consent or giving notification after they've done so. Girls termed "sexually active" -- and that has replaced the word "promiscuous" -- are given this help in order to prevent illegitimate birth or abortion.Well, we have ordered clinics receiving federal funds to notify the parents such help has been given. One of the nation's leading newspapers has created the term "squeal rule" in editorializing against us for doing this, and we're being criticized for violating the privacy of young people. A judge has recently granted an injunction against an enforcement of our rule. I've watched TV panel shows discuss this issue, seen columnists pontificating on our error, but no one seems to mention morality as playing a part in the subject of sex.Is all of Judeo-Christian tradition wrong? Are we to believe that something so sacred can be looked upon as a purely physical thing with no potential for emotional and psychological harm? And isn't it the parents' right to give counsel and advice to keep their children from making mistakes that may affect their entire lives?Many of us in government would like to know what parents think about this intrusion in their family by government. We're going to fight in the courts. The right of parents and the rights of family take precedence over those of Washington-based bureaucrats and social engineers.But the fight against parental notification is really only one example of many attempts to water down traditional values and even abrogate the original terms of American democracy. Freedom prospers when religion is vibrant and the rule of law under God is acknowledged. When our Founding Fathers passed the First Amendment, they sought to protect churches from government interference. They never intended to construct a wall of hostility between government and the concept of religious belief itself.The evidence of this permeates our history and our government. The Declaration of Independence mentions the Supreme Being no less than four times. "In God We Trust" is engraved on our coinage. The Supreme Court opens its proceedings with a religious invocation. And the members of Congress open their sessions with a prayer. I just happen to believe the schoolchildren of the ed States are entitled to the same privileges as Supreme Court justices and congressmen.Last year, I sent the Congress a constitutional amendment to restore prayer to public schools. Aly this session, there's growing bipartisan support for the amendment, and I am calling on the Congress to act speedily to pass it and to let our children pray.Perhaps some of you recently about the Lubbock school case, where a judge actually ruled that it was unconstitutional for a school district to give equal treatment to religious and nonreligious student groups, even when the group meetings were being held during the students' own time. The First Amendment never intended to require government to discriminate against religious speech.Senators Denton and Hatfield have proposed legislation in the Congress on the whole question of prohibiting discrimination against religious forms of student speech. Such legislation could go far to restore freedom of religious speech for public school students. And I hope the Congress considers these bills quickly. And with your help, I think it's possible we could also get the constitutional amendment through the Congress this year. More than a decade ago, a Supreme Court decision literally wiped off the books of fifty states statutes protecting the rights of unborn children. Abortion on demand now takes the lives of up to one and a half million unborn children a year. Human life legislation ending this tragedy will someday pass the Congress, and you and I must never rest until it does. Unless and until it can be proven that the unborn child is not a living entity, then its right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness must be protected.You may remember that when abortion on demand began, many, and indeed, I'm sure many of you, warned that the practice would lead to a decline in respect for human life, that the philosophical premises used to justify abortion on demand would ultimately be used to justify other attacks on the sacredness of human life -- infanticide or mercy killing. Tragically enough, those warnings proved all too true. Only last year a court permitted the death by starvation of a handicapped infant.I have directed the Health and Human Services Department to make clear to every health care facility in the ed States that the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 protects all handicapped persons against discrimination based on handicaps, including infants. And we have taken the further step of requiring that each and every recipient of federal funds who provides health care services to infants must post and keep posted in a conspicuous place a notice stating that "discriminatory failure to feed and care for handicapped infants in this facility is prohibited by federal law." It also lists a twenty-four-hour; toll-free number so that nurses and others may report violations in time to save the infant's life.In addition, recent legislation introduced by -- in the Congress by Representative Henry Hyde of Illinois not only increases restrictions on publicly financed abortions, it also addresses this whole problem of infanticide. I urge the Congress to begin hearings and to adopt legislation that will protect the right of life to all children, including the disabled or handicapped.Now, I'm sure that you must get discouraged at times, but there you've done better than you know, perhaps. There's a great spiritual awakening in America, a renewal of the traditional values that have been the bedrock of America's goodness and greatness.One recent survey by a Washington-based research council concluded that Americans were far more religious than the people of other nations; 95 percent of those surveyed expressed a belief in God and a huge majority believed the Ten Commandments had real meaning in their lives. And another study has found that an overwhelming majority of Americans disapprove of adultery, teenage sex, pornography, abortion, and hard drugs. And this same study showed a deep reverence for the importance of family ties and religious belief.I think the items that we've discussed here today must be a key part of the nation's political agenda. For the first time the Congress is openly and seriously debating and dealing with the prayer and abortion issues and that's enormous progress right there. I repeat: America is in the midst of a spiritual awakening and a moral renewal. And with your biblical keynote, I say today, "Yes, let justice roll on like a river, righteousness like a never-failing stream."Now, obviously, much of this new political and social consensus I've talked about is based on a positive view of American history, one that takes pride in our country's accomplishments and record. But we must never forget that no government schemes are going to perfect man. We know that living in this world means dealing with what philosophers would call the phenomenology of evil or, as theologians would put it, the doctrine of sin.There is sin and evil in the world, and we're enjoined by Scripture and the Lord Jesus to oppose it with all our might. Our nation, too, has a legacy of evil with which it must deal. The glory of this land has been its capacity for transcending the moral evils of our past. For example, the long struggle of minority citizens for equal rights, once a source of disunity and civil war is now a point of pride for all Americans. We must never go back. There is no room for racism, anti-Semitism, or other forms of ethnic and racial hatred in this country.I know that you've been horrified, as have I, by the resurgence of some hate groups preaching bigotry and prejudice. Use the mighty voice of your pulpits and the powerful standing of your churches to denounce and isolate these hate groups in our midst. The commandment given us is clear and simple: "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself."But whatever sad episodes exist in our past, any objective observer must hold a positive view of American history, a history that has been the story of hopes fulfilled and dreams made into reality. Especially in this century, America has kept alight the torch of freedom, but not just for ourselves but for millions of others around the world.And this brings me to my final point today. During my first press conference as president, in answer to a direct question, I pointed out that, as good Marxist-Leninists, the Soviet leaders have openly and publicly declared that the only morality they recognize is that which will further their cause, which is world revolution. I think I should point out I was only ing Lenin, their guiding spirit, who said in 1920 that they repudiate all morality that proceeds from supernatural ideas -- that's their name for religion -- or ideas that are outside class conceptions. Morality is entirely subordinate to the interests of class war. And everything is moral that is necessary for the annihilation of the old, exploiting social order and for uniting the proletariat.Well, I think the refusal of many influential people to accept this elementary fact of Soviet doctrine illustrates a historical reluctance to see totalitarian powers for what they are. We saw this phenomenon in the 1930s. We see it too often today.This doesn't mean we should isolate ourselves and refuse to seek an understanding with them. I intend to do everything I can to persuade them of our peaceful intent, to remind them that it was the West that refused to use its nuclear monopoly in the forties and fifties for territorial gain and which now proposes 50 percent cut in strategic ballistic missiles and the elimination of an entire class of land-based, intermediate-range nuclear missiles.At the same time, however, they must be made to understand we will never compromise our principles and standards. We will never give away our freedom. We will never abandon our belief in God. And we will never stop searching for a genuine peace. But we can assure none of these things America stands for through the so-called nuclear freeze solutions proposed by some.The truth is that a freeze now would be a very dangerous fraud, for that is merely the illusion of peace. The reality is that we must find peace through strength.I would agree to a freeze if only we could freeze the Soviets' global desires. A freeze at current levels of weapons would remove any incentive for the Soviets to negotiate seriously in Geneva and virtually end our chances to achieve the major arms reductions which we have proposed. Instead, they would achieve their objectives through the freeze.A freeze would reward the Soviet Union for its enormous and unparalleled military buildup. It would prevent the essential and long overdue modernization of ed States and allied defenses and would leave our aging forces increasingly vulnerable. And an honest freeze would require extensive prior negotiations on the systems and numbers to be limited and on the measures to ensure effective verification and compliance. And the kind of a freeze that has been suggested would be virtually impossible to verify. Such a major effort would divert us completely from our current negotiations on achieving substantial reductions.A number of years ago, I heard a young father, a very prominent young man in the entertainment world, addressing a tremendous gathering in California. It was during the time of the cold war, and communism and our own way of life were very much on people's minds. And he was speaking to that subject. And suddenly, though, I heard him saying, "I love my little girls more than anything." And I said to myself, "Oh, no, don't. You can't -- don't say that." But I had underestimated him. He went on: "I would rather see my little girls die now; still believing in God, than have them grow up under communism and one day die no longer believing in God."There were thousands of young people in that audience. They came to their feet with shouts of joy. They had instantly recognized the profound truth in what he had said, with regard to the physical and the soul and what was truly important.Yes, let us pray for the salvation of all of those who live in that totalitarian darkness. Pray they will discover the joy of knowing God. But until they do, let us be aware that while they preach the supremacy of the State, declare its omnipotence over individual man, and predict its eventual domination of all peoples on the earth, they are the focus of evil in the modern world.It was C.S. Lewis who, in his unforgettable Screw Tape Letters, wrote: "The greatest evil is not done now in those sordid 'dens of crime' that Dickens loved to paint. It is not even done in concentration camps and labor camps. In those we see its final result. But it is conceived and ordered; moved, seconded, carried and minuted in clear, carpeted, warmed, and well-lighted offices, by quiet men with white collars and cut fingernails and smooth-shaven cheeks who do not need to raise their voice."Well, because these quiet men do not raise their voices, because they sometimes speak in soothing tones of brotherhood and peace, because, like other dictators before them, they're always making "their final territorial demand," some would have us accept them at their word and accommodate ourselves to their aggressive impulses. But if history teaches anything, it teaches that simpleminded appeasement or wishful thinking about our adversaries is folly. It means the betrayal of our past, the squandering of our freedom.So, I urge you to speak out against those who would place the ed States in a position of military and moral inferiority. You know, I've always believed that old Screw Tape reserved his best efforts for those of you in the Church. So, in your discussions of the nuclear freeze proposals, I urge you to beware the temptation of pride --the temptation of blithely declaring yourselves above it all and label both sides equally at fault, to ignore the facts of history and the aggressive impulses of an evil empire, to simply call the arms race a giant misunderstanding and thereby remove yourself from the struggle between right and wrong and good and evil.I ask you to resist the attempts of those who would have you withhold your support for our efforts, this administration's efforts, to keep America strong and free, while we negotiate real and verifiable reductions in the world's nuclear arsenals and one day, with God's help, their total elimination.While America's military strength is important, let me add here that I've always maintained that the struggle now going on for the world will never be decided by bombs or rockets, by armies or military might. The real crisis we face today is a spiritual one; at root, it is a test of moral will and faith.Whittaker Chambers, the man whose own religious conversion made him a witness to one of the terrible traumas of our time, the Hiss-Chambers case, wrote that the crisis of the Western world exists to the degree in which the West is indifferent to God, the degree to which it collaborates in communism's attempt to make man stand alone without God. And then he said, for Marxism-Leninism is actually the second-oldest faith, first proclaimed in the Garden of Eden with the words of temptation, "Ye shall be as gods."The Western world can answer this challenge, he wrote, "but only provided that its faith in God and the freedom He enjoins is as great as communism's faith in Man."I believe we shall rise to the challenge. I believe that communism is another sad, bizarre chapter in human history whose last -- last pages even now are being written. I believe this because the source of our strength in the quest for human freedom is not material, but spiritual. And because it knows no limitation, it must terrify and ultimately triumph over those who would enslave their fellow man. For in the words of Isaiah: "He giveth power to the faint; and to them that have no might He increased strength. But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary. "Yes, change your world. One of our Founding Fathers, Thomas Paine, said, "We have it within our power to begin the world over again." We can do it, doing together what no one church could do by itself.God bless you and thank you very much. 200606/7681,115 – that’s the average premium for employer-sponsored family coverage per month in . Annually, that amounts to ,375 – or roughly the yearly income of someone working a minimum wage job. And if nothing is done to reform our broken health care system, a recent survey found that over the next ten years, out-of-pocket expenses for Americans with health insurance could increase 35 percent in every state in the country. This week -- in an effort to put the past year’s debate over health insurance reform into perspective -- we’re launching, “Health Reform by the Numbers,” an online campaign using key figures, like ,115, to raise awareness about why we just can’t wait for reform. Download Video: mp4 (463MB) | mp3 (34MB) 201003/98272

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